There goes the neighborhood: The Grolier Club(s) and environs, 1916-1918.

In 1915 the governing Council of the Grolier Club came to the conclusion, after five years of debate, that the Grolier clubhouse at 29 East 32nd Street, built to the Club’s specifications only 25 years before, was too small for its expanding membership, too fragile to support the weight of its rapidly-growing Library, and too flammable to protect … Continue reading There goes the neighborhood: The Grolier Club(s) and environs, 1916-1918.

Finding Our Marbles

In a back corner of the Grolier Club’s library, a curly-bearded gentleman carved in creamy marble is perched atop a bookcase. This little noticed object, recent research has revealed, resulted from a meeting of Victorian global influencers. The portrait sitter revolutionized journalism, and the sculptor brought Australian art into the international limelight. The artifact's back-story … Continue reading Finding Our Marbles

How the Tapperij Came to Be

In fall 1895, Grolierites returned from their summer breaks to a heady surprise in their six-year-old clubhouse at 29 East 32nd Street. Their Romanesque Revival building’s “stiff little colonial grill room” had metamorphosed into a semblance of a Dutch tapperij (taproom), “dim with the light of tallow dips,” as Leslie’s Weekly reported. (The article’s headline: … Continue reading How the Tapperij Came to Be

Interview with Meghan Constantinou, Librarian, The Grolier Club of New York

*This blog post was originally written and translated for and first published on the blog of the Société bibliographique de France on 2 November 2019. Close to Central Park, on a lively street in one of the most exclusive districts of New York City, the Upper East Side, there is an oasis where the visitor, dazzled by … Continue reading Interview with Meghan Constantinou, Librarian, The Grolier Club of New York

The Relationship between the “Grolier Codex” and The Grolier Club of New York*

On October 8, the New York Times reported the death of Yale anthropologist and Mayan language expert, Michael D. Coe (1929-2019). Dr. Coe was responsible for translating and authenticating the so-called “Grolier Codex,” a ca. 12thc Mayan astronomical calendar discovered in a cave in Mexico in the 1960s and considered the oldest manuscript on paper … Continue reading The Relationship between the “Grolier Codex” and The Grolier Club of New York*